Future of Craft

Lucy Elisabeth

What do you do and what are you most proud of in your making/designing history?

I like to call myself a sculptural illustrator, which in the most simple terms means I draw with wire. To date my biggest achievement is having a solo exhibition. I’m increasingly finding that as my practice is evolving and becoming more confident and expressive, opportunities are presenting themselves. To be involved in London Craft week is a huge and exciting experience for me.

Where do you work and what materials do you prefer/get most inspired by?

I love the immediacy of wire, the sense of creating a line that draws within a space, rather than on a sheet of paper. I have recently been exploring application of colour, which has energised my desire to play, experiment and take risks with my work.

What do think will be important or significant for craft practice in general in the future?

With regards to craft in the future, it plays such a significant part of our lives that I think skill and design is taken for granted by the general population. More focus needs to be placed on ensuring that the ability to make, create and design does not die out, starting with the greatest need to reintegrate the arts back into everyday learning in schools. Risk taking, experimenting and making mistakes is all part of learning and the creative process and we should try our best not to lose that!

What are your own aspirations for the next five years?

With reference to my own practice, I aim to create a collection of work that interior designers can envisage in their clients’ interiors. I would love to create a body of work for a hotel, restaurant or other interesting public space. Also perhaps another solo exhibition showcasing some of my larger and more intricate colour works.

Lucy has been a member of Design-Nation since 2018.